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Thrifty fashion blogger who only wears second-hand clothes will buy all of her Christmas gifts from charity shops

Thrifty fashion blogger plans a second-hand Christmas by shopping for all her gifts at charity shops – saving around £ 560 compared to the average spend and helping to save the planet.

While 24-year-old Iso Neville spends around £ 200 each year on party favors, the average spend per adult in the UK is £ 760, according to Atomik Research. the money also goes to charity.

The social media manager of an art agency, Iso, in London Bridge, south-east London, who has frequented vintage stores since her school days, said: “As a teenager, Normal Main Street clothing stores were too far away for me without getting a lift from my parents.

Iso shares her tips for finding treasures in flea markets. (Collection / PA Real Life)

She added, “Instead, I was browsing charity stores near my home and quickly discovered that there were a lot of treasures for sale at a bargain price.

“Now that I’m older, I don’t see the need to shop in fast fashion stores when thrift stores have such high quality items.”

Since going 100% second-hand in 2019 – saving money, avoiding waste, and protecting the environment, as well as supporting charity – Iso hasn’t looked back.

Iso went 100% used in 2019. (Collect / PA Real Life)

Iso went 100% used in 2019. (Collect / PA Real Life)

She said: “I used to buy a lot of second-hand things already, but when I heard a shocking statistic – that we have enough clothes on earth right now to dress the next six generations – it made me want to cut out new clothes for good.

“Sustainability is very important to me and there are some really good quality clothes in charity stores that outlive your average clothes in a fast fashion store.”

Now, Iso’s thrifty shopping methods have been applied to the purchase of gifts.

  1. Research regularly – visit your local store about twice a month as new stock is updated daily.

  2. Browse online – Barnardo’s has a great website – and Thrift + lets you buy used items and choose which charity to donate the profits to.

  3. Find the premium section – most charity stores have a section dedicated to better quality items.

  4. Buy Books – Used books are incredibly inexpensive and are just as good as their brand new counterparts.

  5. Look carefully – some items may be more mixed up than in the fast fashion stores, so check the sections that are not in your size. You might find a treasure that has been hidden in the wrong place!

She said, “My friends and family know how much I believe in charity shops, so now they expect all the gifts I buy to be second-hand.

“No one ever complained to me because it’s the idea that matters and after all you would never even know the items weren’t new!”

Frequently complimented on her incredible finds, she also hopes to lift the stigma attached to buying second-hand items.

Iso says the environment is also a major factor in his thrifty fashion.  (Collection / PA Real Life)

Iso says the environment is also a major factor in his thrifty fashion. (Collection / PA Real Life)

She said: “There is definitely some sort of taboo surrounding second-hand shopping, but it’s just not true that pre-liked items are rubbish.

“Since the lockdown, it looks like a lot of people in the UK have vacated because there is so much to choose from in charity shops right now.

“You can really find amazing stuff and I was even able to furnish my house with things I bought from Barnardo.”

Iso regularly visits his local charity stores to browse their new stock.  (Collection / PA Real Life)

Iso regularly visits his local charity stores to browse their new stock. (Collection / PA Real Life)

And this year, Iso intends to be thrifty shopping for Christmas presents.

She said: “I have a friend who recently got into tennis so I found a bundle of brand new tennis balls and Wimbledon pins at a local charity store, which I will give her this Xmas.

“A good tip for giving thrifty gifts is to buy a plant from the garden center and buy a plant pot from a charity store to go with it.”

Iso saves around £ 560 compared to the average spending on Christmas gifts.  (Collection / PA Real Life)

Iso saves around £ 560 compared to the average spending on Christmas gifts. (Collection / PA Real Life)

She added, “No one will ever know it’s used and they often have very original and interesting plant pots for sale.

“On average, I save at least 50% on a used item compared to buying a new item. “

According to a survey conducted by the children’s charity Barnardo’s, in partnership with Atomik Research, two-thirds of Britons say they will consider buying their Christmas presents at charity shops this year.

Iso says her family and friends now expect the gifts she buys to be second-hand.  (Collection / PA Real Life)

Iso says her family and friends now expect the gifts she buys to be second-hand. (Collection / PA Real Life)

And four-fifths of adults said thoughtfulness is key to a perfect gift, while durability is also important for a quarter of those surveyed.

Iso said: “I am very environmentally conscious and Christmas can be a pretty tedious time of year, but it doesn’t have to be.

“I use my social media to get this message out and to make sure that if I post a photo, people know that whatever I’m wearing is second-hand.”

  1. Chloe Logo Sock Boots – cost £ 90, originally £ 1,400, saving her £ 1,310

  2. Burberry Trench – costs £ 150, originally around £ 1,500, saving her £ 1,350

  3. Louis Vuitton Noé handbag – costs £ 300, originally £ 1,250, saving her £ 950

  4. Aquazzura Wild Thing Sandals – cost £ 100, originally £ 510, saving her £ 410

  5. Saint Laurent Anja Heels – cost £ 150, originally £ 520, saving her £ 370

She added: “A lot of people will have tighter purse strings this Christmas after the effects of the pandemic, so charity shopping is a great way to save extra money.”

Barnardo’s Trading Managing Director Roy Clark said: “The Christmas season is always an exciting time and it’s great to see that so many people turn to charity shops for inspiration.

“By shopping at Barnardo’s in a store or online, you can find fantastic gifts for your friends and family, and you will also help us continue to provide essential services to children, youth, parents and caregivers. vulnerable at Christmas and throughout the year. “

– Last year, more than 358,000 children, young people, parents and carers were supported by Barnardo’s through more than 800 services across the UK, such as young carers, people discharged from care, families in need of care. ‘fostering and adoptive parents, training and skills or parenting courses. For more information visit www.barnardos.org.uk